The Secret Fountain of Youth–When Knowing Becomes Curiously Unknown

The breaking wave and the muscle as it contracts obey the same law.   Delicate line gathers the body’s total strength in a bold balance.  Shall my soul meet so severe a curve, journeying on its way to form?  Dag Hammarskjold

Movement and the ocean’s fluidity is a constant that we coast dwellers fully know and understand. A single droplet separates from the body ocean. Mesmerized, we watch the continuity found in the progressive repeated change of the tides as the waves, the colored masses separate as energy regenerates itself.  We innately understand that change is constant.

And then…art enters with flair and a demand.

Look at me!  You thought you knew something.  Look at me! Look at me!  Look at me again…

And you do.  You look.  And you do look again. And then you begin to see with fresh eyes as you finish what the artist captured in the work being shared.  You think about the possibilities and the impossibilities.  And the only thing you know for sure is that you are unsure.  There are more questions now than answers.  Look at what photographer Ray Collins evokes in his arresting work on waves.  Look!  

In the arts you are given a key to a secret of youth. Curiosity–the continual what-happens-next factor on the road to discovery.  And that is how it should be.  Building blocks occur with each new discovery. And that is what Collins provides as his works force a paradigm shift to our understanding of form, of motion, of what it is that we thought we knew.  That is what the arts seek always to do – expand and/or shift our current world view.

Those of us in the arts are hoping to gather support for STEAM not STEM in schools.  The world needs both Bill Gates (the STEM guy) and Steve Jobs (the STEAM guy).  Support for the arts is crucial.  Please vote responsibly.   Enjoy!

If you find anything in this post useful that might be helpful to those involved with funding the arts, please share.  Our arts and cultural development depend upon our voices. Raise them in support of the arts.

 

 

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